"Creating a Culture of Caring Through Reconciliation as a Non-Indigenous Teacher": An Interview with Nathan Tidridge

Posted by Alysha Groff on September 13, 2016

As part of Facing History and Ourselves three day summer seminar "CHC2 Canadian History through a Facing History Lens",  Nathan Tidridge came to speak about "Creating a Culture of Caring Through Reconciliation as  Non-Indigenous Teacher."

Nathan Tidridge teaches at Waterdown District High School and was awarded the Premier’s Award for Teaching Excellence (Teacher of the Year) and the Charles Baillie Award for Excellence in Secondary School Teaching by Queen's University. The author of four books exploring the Crown in Canada, Tidridge's latest work (The Queen at the Council Fire: The Treaty of Niagara, Reconciliation and the Dignified Crown in Canada) was launched by the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Over the years Tidridge has spoken to numerous groups across the country, including recently the Manitoba Council of Elders,  and The Crown in the 21st Century conference held in Victoria. In 2015 he was proud to be appointed to both the Ontario Heritage Trust Board of Directors and the National Advisory Council of the Prince's Charities Canada. 
 
Learn more about Nathan Tidridge's work at www.canadiancrown.com, or on his teacher website www.tidridge.com
 

If you were unable to attend and would like to see the talk it was streamed and can be accessed on Periscope.

Following the event I had a chance to catch up with Nathan and talk to him a little bit about his experiences teaching difficult content in the highschool classroom. Whether or not you were able to attend this great talk, take a look at the following interview and consider the following:

1. How could you use the information in this interview to better your own teaching practice?

2. How might this interview help you contextualize the importance of addressing the TRC calls to action for your department and school?

3. How could the interview be used to help inspire and build confidence in educators to incorporate Indigenous Studies into their classrooms?

 

What do you feel is your greatest responsibility as a non-Indigenous person teaching Indigenous studies?

 

What made you passionate to learn more about and teach Indigenous Studies?


 

How has the Facing History and Ourselves pedagogy helped you to teach this difficult and challenging content?

 

 

What are a few Facing History and Ourselves resources that you use most frequently in your classroom?

 

 

How did you get the experience or knowledge required to teach this content? When did you think you had enough to start bringing it into your classroom?

 

 

What is some advice you could give to educators who are hesitant or scared of this material?

 

 

Are you ever afraid of offending people when teaching this content?

 

 

What do you think the next steps are for educators to meet the TRC calls to action?

 

 

Topics: Teaching, History, Canada, Indigenous, CHG, CHC

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